Tuesday, December 13, 2011

National Canadian Clothing Rules, Eh

(Photo by Odd Andersen AFP-GETTY)

Canada has taken the big leap, banning the wearing of the Islamic veil known as the niqab at citizenship ceremonies.

“This is not simply a practical measure. It is a matter of deep principle that goes to the heart of our identity and our values of openness and equality,” Immigration Minister Jason Kenney said Monday as he announced the changes in Montreal.
“The citizenship oath is a quintessentially public act. It is a public declaration that you are joining the Canadian family and it must be taken freely and openly,”

While some Muslims consider banning the veil violates their religious rights some other people feel it is a security risk, because some terrorists wear the full body cloaks to hide bombs.

But what’s next? Will shoes be banned to stop people from throwing them at dictators such as Iran’s Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. The Iranian news agency Mehr reported a laid off worker, S Rashid, was beaten up by the crowd when he expressed his discontent by tossing his shoe; he missed.

 Throwing shoes is a strong expression of unhappiness in the Middle East.

Next thing you know Canada will at least try to discourage the use of its trademark “eh.” The Canadian Web site Ask Men says it is the No. 1 Canadian expression.

“In short, “eh” -- the most popular Canadian expression of them all -- is used to solicit conversation,” Ask Men reports.

Some might, on the other hand, find it odd that stories about the citizen-niqab battle do not mention the honor code.

A Muslim Canadian is on trial now on murder charges for killing his wife and three daughters for allegedly violating the Islamic honor code. He says he would do it again.

“While precise statistics are scarce, the UN estimates thousands of women are killed annually in the name of family honor (National Geographic). Other practices that are woven into the sharia debate, such as female genital mutilation, adolescent marriages, polygamy, and gender-biased inheritance rules, elicit as much controversy. There is significant debate over what the Quran sanctions and what practices were pulled from local customs and predate Islam,” the Council of Foreign Relations reports.

dispatch first appeared on Technorati.com

1 comment:

  1. If school girls wish to wear a headscarf in school, I have no problem with it, as long as it's ok for other girls and boys can wear hats of their choosing.After all, it hasn't been that long since hats in the western world carried deep symbolic meaning -- hats on for women and hats off for men. If is is legal because of some religious claim, to wear a niqab then anyone wearing a mask should be legal. People immigrating to our country should respect our customs. We would not presume to walk down the streets of Tehran in a short skirt and sleeveless blouse, especially if you are male.And don't get me started on that "honour" killing. Now the coward is trying to weasel out of his part in the murder of his daughters. Some honour indeed!